Book Discussion Groups

Monday Evening Book Group

Meets the 2nd Monday of each month 6:30 P.M.
Cambridge Community Library

Call the library with questions
(423-3900)

New members are welcome to the group at any time! There is no pressure to attend every session–come when you can!

Wednesday Evening Book Group

Meets the third Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M.
This group, also known as the Ladies’ Rhythm and Movement Society, has limited its members to 12, but has a waiting list at the circulation desk.

The group meets in the homes of its members.

 

Monday Book Club Titles:
November

“The Soloist” by Steve Lopez

Based on the true story of Nathaniel Ayers, a promising musician who developed schizophrenia and became homeless. Steve Lopez, a journalist, who envisions Ayers as a topic for his column, unearths the extraordinary story and a bond that will profoundly change his own life as well.

October

“The Chatham School Affair” by Thomas H. Cook

As he draws up his will, Attorney Henry Griswald is haunted by a long-buried secret: the truth behind the event the world knew as the Chatham School Affair, a controversial tragedy that destroyed five lives, shattered a quiet community, and forever scarred the young boy. Layer by layer, Cook paints a portrait of a woman, a school, and a town in which passionate violence seems impossible… and inevitable.

September

“Commonwealth” by Ann Patchett

The acclaimed, bestselling author—winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize—tells the enthralling story of how an unexpected romantic encounter irrevocably changes two families’ lives.  Told with equal measures of humor and heartbreak, Commonwealth is a meditation on inspiration, interpretation, and the ownership of stories. It is a brilliant and tender tale of the far-reaching ties of love and responsibility that bind us together.

August

“The Rosie Project” by Graeme Simsion

An International bestselling romantic comedy “bursting with warmth, emotional depth, and…humor,” (Entertainment Weekly) featuring the oddly charming, socially challenged genetics professor, Don, as he seeks true love.

July

“Euphoria” by Lily King

Inspired by events in the life of revolutionary anthropologist Margaret Mead, Euphoria is the story of three young, gifted anthropologists of the 1930s caught in a passionate love triangle that threatens their bonds, their careers, and, ultimately, their lives.

June

“For Keeps: Women Tell the Truth About Their Bodies, Growing Older, and Acceptance” edited by Victoria Zackheim

An inspirational collection of personal essays from 27 writers on their ever-changing bodies that will resonate with every maturing woman.  From a mastectomy that renewed one woman’s lease on life, to the emergence of gray hairs and wrinkles, each woman addresses aging, illness, injury, and life circumstances with humor and grace.  Ultimately, For Keeps challenges every woman to rethink the way she sees her body through various life-altering changes in order to lead a more healthy, satisfying, and productive life.

May

“Plainsong” by Kent Haruf

A heartstrong story of family and romance, tribulation and tenacity, set on the High Plains east of of Denver.

“Resonant and meaningful…A song of praise in honor of the lives it chronicles [and] a story about people’s ability to adapt and redeem themselves, to heal wounds of isolation by moving, gropingly and imperfectly, toward community.”  -Richard Tillinghast Washington Post Book World 

April

“Orphan Train: A Novel” By Christina Baker Kline

Between 1854 and 1929, so-called orphan trains ran regularly from the cities of the East Coast to the farmlands of the Midwest, carrying thousands of abandoned children whose fates would be determined by pure luck.  Moving between contemporary Maine and Depression-era Minnesota, Orphan Train is a powerful tale of upheaval and resilience, second chances, and unexpected friendship.

March

“Still Life” By Louise Penny

Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Sûreté du Québec and his team of investigators are called in to the scene of a suspicious death in a rural village south of Montréal and yet a world away. With this award-winning first novel, Louise Penny introduces an engaging hero in Inspector Gamache, who commands his forces–and this series–with power, ingenuity, and charm.

“A perfectly executed traditional mystery” – Denver Post

February

“Me Before You” By JoJo Moyes

Brings to life two people who couldn’t have less in common—a heartbreakingly romantic novel that asks, What do you do when making the person you love happy also means breaking your own heart?

January

“Tenth of December” by George Saunders

In a collection of short stories about class, sex, love, loss, work, despair and war, the author explores the question of what makes us good and what makes us human.

December

“The Vacationers” by Emma Straub

A vacation with family and friends may not turn out as we envisioned it. “The Vacationers” is irresistibly funny and enchantingly warm as it shows us the wonderful, messy truth about family, friendship, and love.