Book Discussion Groups

Monday Evening Book Group

Meets the 2nd Monday of each month 6:30 P.M.
Cambridge Community Library

Call the library with questions
(423-3900)

New members are welcome to the group at any time! There is no pressure to attend every session–come when you can!

Wednesday Evening Book Group

Meets the third Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M.
This group, also known as the Ladies’ Rhythm and Movement Society, has limited its members to 12, but has a waiting list at the circulation desk.

The group meets in the homes of its members.

 

Monday Book Club Titles:
September

“The Sense of an Ending” by Julian Barnes

This intense novel follows a middle-aged man as he contends with a past he has never much thought about. He is then presented with a mysterious legacy that obliges him to reconsider a variety of things he thought he’d understood all along, and to revise his estimation of his own nature and place in the world.

August

“Everything you wanted to know about Indians But were afraid to ask” by Anton Treuer

White/Indian relations are often characterized by guilt and anger. Everything You Wanted to Know about Indians But Were Afraid to Ask cuts through the emotion and builds a foundation for true understanding and positive action.

July

“Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel

An audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

June

“Circling the Sun: A Novel” by Paula McLain

Set against the majestic landscape of early-twentieth-century Africa, McLain’s powerful tale reveals the extraordinary adventures of a woman before her time, the exhilaration of freedom and its cost, and the tenacity of the human spirit.

May

“Hillbilly Elegy” by J. D. Vance

A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

April

“The Nest” By Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney

Every family has its problems. But even among the most troubled, the Plumb family stands out as spectacularly dysfunctional.  A warm, funny and acutely perceptive debut novel about four adult siblings and the fate of the shared inheritance that has shaped their choices and their lives.

March

“Population: 485 Meeting Your Neighbors One Siren at a Time” By Michael Perry

After a 12-year absence, a real-life prodigal son returns to his hometown–New Auburn, Wisconsin, population: 485–and joins the volunteer fire and rescue department. By turns fiery and funny, violent and gentle, this is the true account of a search for rootedness in a place from the past.

“Part portrait of a place, part rescue manual, part rumination on life and death, [ it ] is a beautiful meditation on the things that matter.” – Seattle Times

February

“Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President” by Candice Millard

James A. Garfield was one of the most extraordinary men ever elected president. Born into abject poverty, he rose to become a wunderkind scholar, a Civil War hero, and a renowned and admired reformist congressman. Nominated for president against his will, he engaged in a fierce battle with the corrupt political establishment. But four months after his inauguration, a deranged office seeker tracked Garfield down and shot him in the back.

January

“Lucy” by Ellen Feldman

Drawing on recently discovered materials to re-create the voice of a woman who played a crucial but silent role in the Roosevelt presidency, Lucy is a remarkably sensitive exploration of the private lives behind a public marriage.

December

“Landline” by Rainbow Rowell

As far as time machines go, a magic telephone is pretty useless.

TV writer Georgie McCool can’t actually visit the past; all she can do is call it, and hope it picks up. And hope he picks up — because once Georgie realizes she has a magic phone that calls into the past, all she wants is to make things right with her husband, Neal.

November

“The Soloist” by Steve Lopez

Based on the true story of Nathaniel Ayers, a promising musician who developed schizophrenia and became homeless. Steve Lopez, a journalist, who envisions Ayers as a topic for his column, unearths the extraordinary story and a bond that will profoundly change his own life as well.

October

“The Chatham School Affair” by Thomas H. Cook

As he draws up his will, Attorney Henry Griswald is haunted by a long-buried secret: the truth behind the event the world knew as the Chatham School Affair, a controversial tragedy that destroyed five lives, shattered a quiet community, and forever scarred the young boy. Layer by layer, Cook paints a portrait of a woman, a school, and a town in which passionate violence seems impossible… and inevitable.